Jonathan Butler speaks on social justice

Racial equality and the climate on MU's campus are important topics for this student leader

By Haley Reed for Vox Magazine

Jonathan Butler captured the nation’s attention after announcing he would not eat until Tim Wolfe resigned from his position as UM System President. In a dramatic and historic month, the Concerned Student 1950 movement held protests on the University of Missouri campus, Wolfe resigned and Chancellor R. Bowen Loftin announced he will transition away from his position at the end of the year.

But social justice and racial equality at the University of Missouri aren’t new issues for Butler.

 

Vox published an interview with Butler and other student leaders Sept. 22 about what MU means to them. In light of recent events, Vox editors went back to the original interview footage and looked at what Butler had to say weeks before his hunger strike.

One thing was clear: Butler was already on a mission to make MU a more inclusive and safe campus for all students.

“For me Mizzou means two things,” Butler says in the video. “It means struggle, and it means hope.”

As a student of color, Butler says he has faced a lot of discrimination on campus. However, he is inspired by the people around him.

“I am always eager about what can we do to further the social justice causes on campus,” Butler says. “How can we continue to make the campus climate and the environment better for students?”

Butler made it clear he enjoys his program, his classes and the people he works with.

“I also love, even more than that, to see the change that we can continue to make – not only on this campus but in this world.”

But social justice and racial equality at the University of Missouri aren’t new issues for Butler.

Vox published an interview with Butler and other student leaders Sept. 22 about what MU means to them. In light of recent events, Vox editors went back to the original interview footage and looked at what Butler had to say weeks before his hunger strike.

One thing was clear: Butler was already on a mission to make MU a more inclusive and safe campus for all students.

“For me Mizzou means two things,” Butler says in the video. “It means struggle, and it means hope.”

As a student of color, Butler says he has faced a lot of discrimination on campus. However, he is inspired by the people around him.

“I am always eager about what can we do to further the social justice causes on campus,” Butler says. “How can we continue to make the campus climate and the environment better for students?”

Butler made it clear he enjoys his program, his classes and the people he works with.

“I also love, even more than that, to see the change that we can continue to make – not only on this campus but in this world.”